History Of Creative Writing

History Of Creative Writing-69
There’s humour in Trish Nugent’s poem ‘Uncle Ned,’ as revealed in an innocent remark made by a five year old wanting to know where Maud (the ‘troubling’ of Yeats’ life) had ‘gone.’ The third section of ‘Easter 1916’ deal with the natural world (cloud to tumbling cloud, moor-hens, moor-cocks, stream…reflecting the flux and flow of life), imagery which surfaces throughout this collection of new works.

There’s humour in Trish Nugent’s poem ‘Uncle Ned,’ as revealed in an innocent remark made by a five year old wanting to know where Maud (the ‘troubling’ of Yeats’ life) had ‘gone.’ The third section of ‘Easter 1916’ deal with the natural world (cloud to tumbling cloud, moor-hens, moor-cocks, stream…reflecting the flux and flow of life), imagery which surfaces throughout this collection of new works.

Events are still taking place all over the country.

These range from theatrical performances, photography exhibitions, poetry readings, re-enactments, un-veilings, recitals.

Novelist Eileen Casey on Commemorative events, 1916 and the rural electrification scheme So far, commemorative events for 1916 have been many and varied.

Communities all over Ireland participated and continue to do so.

Larry, a man of many talents, wrote about an advertisement for Mc Grath’s tea, popular at the time.

Culture and war go hand in hand however, captured in the chilling closing lines of his poem ‘Suburban Life’….The idea behind ‘Reading The Lines’ comes from William Butler Yeats’ ‘Easter 1916’.Poets were invited to choose a line from this iconic work which resonated for them, either culturally, politically or historically.Facilitators and organisers have to be congratulated for the amount of energy inputted.Over the last number of months, I’ve been privileged to collaborate with diverse groups such as those located at Phoenix Clubhouse, Clondalkin and Platform One, Rua Red Arts Centre, Tallaght.The dawn came and went to a rising, foggy day/and of course, a big orb of a sun in the blue skies.Nora chose to remember Thomas Mac Donagh, one of the signatories of the Proclamation in a poem called ‘Resumé’….Platform One(a group who meet in Rua Red Arts Centre) have just produced ‘Reading The Lines,’ an anthology of poetry, in conjunction with ‘Live Encounters,’ an online poetry journal.The journal is co-edited by Mark Ulyseas and myself and received funding support from South Dublin County Council’s Commemorations Fund.Thomas posited that it was ‘Better to die in Flander’s mud than on Dublin’s cobbled streets.’ All of the writing from members of Phoenix Clubhouse proved stirring and no wonder….after all, the Clubhouse is named for the mythical phoenix, a bird that rises from its own ashes, as a new nation also rose from the fires of war.Writers throughout South Dublin have been particularly busy.

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